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Crysis Warhead Review - PC

8
Gameplay: 7 stars 7
Graphics: 9 stars 9
Audio: 8 stars 8
Multiplayer: 8 stars 8
Innovation: 7 stars 7
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Introduction

Crysis was considered to be something of a breakthrough game during 2007, being hailed as one of the best shooters ever made, and a step forward for PC gaming. The game went on to sell more than 1.5 million copies worldwide, and received multiple awards from reviewers. Now, in 2008, Crytek have released their latest project, Crysis Warhead, but will it replicate the success of the original?

Gameplay

Crysis Warhead doesn’t vary all that much from its predecessor, as you would expect. A lot of the things you’ll see and interact with are recycled from Crysis, but the important thing, of course, is how they are put to use. The game’s story slots in nicely with that of Crysis, those that have played through the game will already know about the events that take place on the island, and Warhead serves to illustrate another side to the story, from a different perspective. You’re put in the shoes of the British Sergeant Michael Sykes (commonly known by the name Psycho), who should be easily recognisable to Crysis veterans. He’s the kind of guy who laughs in the face of danger, which is fortunate since you’ll be facing plenty of it during the game. The story itself is fairly well thought out and entertaining, with some interesting scenarios to work your way through. One thing that Warhead is that Crysis isn’t is action packed. Sure, Crysis had its moments, but there were a lot of breaks between combat sections, and you had to use your head a bit more than you would in a game like Call of Duty. Warhead breaks away from the flow of Crysis by focusing on packing as much action and combat into the game’s story mode as possible.

Anyone who has played Crysis will already be familiar with the game’s (default) controls, but I’ll briefly outline them for the uniformed. Left click on the mouse fires your equipped weapon, right click changes to iron sights or scope view on certain weapons, moving is done with arrow keys and jumping is done by pressing the spacebar. All of the game’s controls can be customised as much as you like however, so you can adapt the game to suit your playing style. The same suit abilities from the original make a reappearance, those being Armor, Strength, Speed and Cloak. All of them have their own important uses during the game, though Armor is the one that gets used the most, since it reduces the damage you take from enemy attacks significantly, and is also the default suit ability. Strength allows you to jump much higher than usual, and take out enemy soldiers with a single punch. Speed allows you to run very quickly for a short period of time. Cloak allows you to become invisible for a short span of time, which is good for quick stealth attacks.

Gameplay is largely unchanged from Crysis, you’ll be taking on groups and camps of enemies, as well as ...

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